Interlude: Resolutions

Interlude: Resolutions

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Until this year, I’ve never been the type of person to set “resolutions” for myself.

I think that the majority of society feels like setting New Years Resolutions are corny and subjective to a made up concept of time-keeping. Furthermore, I kind of see setting resolutions the same way I look at goal-setting: what is the purpose of setting an arbitrary goal with a never-ending expiry when I could just wake up daily and set out to achieve what needs to be achieved? Basically, contrary to the reason people usually set goals, I see a list of goals as an excuse to put off chasing something that isn’t even necessarily unattainable at the very moment; redundancy. Can’t score until you start shooting, right?

Anyways, what I’ve been attempting to allude to is that this year I decided to set a few resolutions for myself. Not necessarily because I felt like I needed them to achieve a higher level of living in 2018, but moreso as a semi-realistic check-up and reflection on how I’m really doing right now. Nothing career or exercise related, or any of that corny stuff. Just personal happiness, enjoyment, and fulfillment based.  January 1st, 2018 was such a dreadful day that it made me want to literally chase my own happiness.

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As a second comparison, resolutions are also kinda like opinions: you should probably keep yours to yourself because people might think that you’re weird (I think I scared off the first girl that I told my resolutions to this year for a little bit). BUT since rules are meant to be broken and because no laws can hold me, I’m going to share mine with y’all anyways. As a reward for sitting thru them all (/skipping all the way to the end but still giving me the click), I’ll include a special playlist at the end, just for y’all. ❤


My 2018 Resolutions: 

1. To Infiltrate The Art, Culture, & Photography Community
An argument could be made that I’ve been slowly but surely making my way into the music community (when an artist from Chicago reached out and told me that people at his recording studio recommended me, this was confirmed), though my local presence in the local community has been weak at best.

My first resolution for 2018 was to get more involved with the local cultural communities, including the music scene, but namely the strong art and photography core in my city. Within 2 months I got accepted into my first gallery show for film photography, but unfortunately, I was living in LA at the time so I didn’t get an opportunity to participate. We’re still working on that one. Fortunately, within the same time frame, I was able to meet some great musicians and a group of kids out of Victoria looking to put the city on the map with a new wave of music and talent coming in and out. I’m looking forward to working with them more as time goes on!

 

 2.  To Try HARDER To Be Social
I’m the type of person that loves to pretend I don’t know anyone, or that I have nothing to be doing. In reality, not to sound like as big of a tool as I’m about to, but I know A LOT of people and I consistently have things that I could be doing (that aren’t as solitary as my preferred pastimes)… I just don’t be doing ’em. I didn’t use to be like this, but this last year definitely bore down on me in many ways.

Very simple resolution: stop looking for excuses to not go and do something. Accept invitations. Send invitations. All in all, my hope is that this will lead to me meeting new people – since university I haven’t had many periods of actively meeting new people. This resolution also intertwines with the first one nicely.

 

 3. To Re-gain An Impressive Level of Music Knowledge
THIS is probably the most important one to me. Sure, outward goals are great, being social is amazing, but at the end of the day, internal achievements will always be the most rewarding.

For 3 years I actively ran a music blog. Even when I wasn’t that active with writing, I was always on top of all the new music. Always looking for leaks, always sharing new stuff, and always asking people what they were listening to. At one point, I can honestly say that I was a modern hip-hop encyclopedia (specializing in Drake album leaks and random Chance the Rapper facts), now, I don’t possess much more music trivia than your average radio listener. This culminated when I went to LA in October and couldn’t name any of the big songs that were being played at the convention I was at; I blamed it on being Canadian and not being exposed to good hip-hop at home, but as an internet kid we all knew this was a cop-out. In 2018 I aim to get back in the know about what all the kids these days are listening to. Old man Hosp back at it again.

A big part of why I was always actively seeking out the best new music, was because I loved making playlists (big 8tracks guy over here). So, to officially make good on this resolution, I’ve included a new Soundcloud playlist below with all of my favorite music that I’ve found recently. The HHT Interlude, volume 5. And please, next time we speak, show me your favorite song!

Here’s to more to happiness in 2018

Different Day / Same Hangover

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2 Weeks / Different Day, Same Hangover

[April 29th, 2018]
I’ve said my goodbyes, so I guess my latest trip officially starts right now.

Though I don’t actually head out to London for another 2 weeks, mentally I’m already checked out. Last night was my best friend’s 24th birthday (rightfully themed to the 2000’s – a time of carelessness we all kind of wish we could revisit). It was one of those instantly nostalgic feeling get-togethers; I’m not sure if it was the theme or the people, but everything felt like it never skipped a beat. I call this effect “different day, same hangover”. Regardless, it will serve as a pinpoint on this group’s rocky existential timeline that will probably continue along until we collectively become the 10th season of Friends and become too highly paid to care anymore. This morning followed suit with a ceremonial group brunch – truncated by my early exit – and now I’m on the ferry back home.

I think the last set of goodbyes before long-term travels are always kind of weird because no one really knows what to say. Like, “bye [for now?] – hope you don’t die somewhere exotic, I guess”. I don’t know, maybe I’m the only one who thinks like this.

Skiptracing by Mild High Club is playing, and it seems very suitable all the way down to the name of the band.

Anyways – 2 weeks. Since starting this little pseudo travel blog a year ago, I’m a lot better traveled than before. The last 16 or so months have been eventful (ideally, by now I’ve just published my year in review, and you’re able to read that HERE. If not, well, this is awkward), and even though life constantly feels slow, part of me knows that I’m probably going to be in for an incredibly eventful summer. You know, ‘the best summer ever’ type vibes; the way that the lead up to every summer usually feels.

I’ve spoken about the idea of an endless summer before, so I’ll try to spare the resonance, but I think I’m finally starting to get excited. I’ll be heading into Europe and the UK for my first time ever, setting up shop in London and hoping to make it out unscathed (well maybe a little scathed). I don’t have any jobs lined up besides a few leads, I have no place to stay yet, and if we’re being realistic I probably don’t have enough money in my bank account to be entering a foreign country with the type of plans that I have.

A year ago, I still wouldn’t have been terrified, but I would’ve definitely been wary. Seeing as ‘planning’ didn’t do me so well the first time around, and that most of my more spontaneous outings have played out well in one way or another, I’m very okay with it this time.

I spent the first two months of 2018 living in Los Angeles. (Also, I hate how much I’ve used the word “I” so far in this – I’m gonna get to back to my regular how-to style for the next one. Bare with me, I’m trying to get myself excited to document life again. I had to get myself excited about life again first, so this is merely the second step). L.A. was one of those trips where people would ask me what I was going out there to do and I would tell them “basically the same thing I do at home – but it’s sunny there”. In all reality, it was probably the best solo trip that I’ve had so far. I think I realized how helpful it is to be around other starving creatives. It turned the theory that most of my internet friends are willing to help me out more than my real friends into law.

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me, recently.

Where was I again? Oh right, 2 weeks left. (Repetition is a drug, according to Jermaine). Packing, preparing, praying… and push-ups? Honestly, I don’t think any of this stuff will directly correlate to a good trip as much as an open mind and a shot-shooters touch can, but hey, I’d be remiss not to leave my mother with a little peace of mind before I fly the coup.

I don’t really have anything else to say besides that I don’t actually know anything about UK culture besides that a peace-sign facing the wrong direction means a bad word and that my tea game is about to be ELEVATED. Can someone inform me what context to use the word “Peng” in? Because it sounds rad and I intend to use it as much as possible.

But yeah, if you stay out in London and want to link – maybe go for a photo walk – hit my line. Otherwise stay tuned, and hopefully, I’ll find some time in between life to tell you some more stories. I have a lot of good ones from this past year, though you’ll probably never hear them.

(I believe in life’s parallels, so if you were wondering by the end of this entry has been so awkward and sudden then scroll back to up to the first point I was making about weird goodbyes.)

Bye for now – don’t die somewhere exotic,

-hosp

How to Get Paid To Write Online

Every creative has a dream of one day being paid simply to keep making what they love. For some, this may mean in a workplace setting, for some this means freelancing, and for those chosen few that are deemed important enough, their audiences alone can provide enough funding to survive happily. Learn about a new way for writers to make money online WHILE building up their followings.

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Here is how to get paid to write and publish online:

When I started this blog almost 10 months ago, it was basically an “anti-travel-blog” travel blog. I hated the ideas pressed by travel blogs, and I hated the idea that somehow flying 14 hours away from home for a few months would change me.

10 months later this still isn’t a traditional travel blog in any sense, and flying to Australia didn’t change me. With that said, this isn’t a travel blog because it’s less about the travel itself, as it is about the stories. Being physically located in every place I’ve gotten the chance to see over these 10 months (a list way bigger than I ever anticipated) didn’t change me, but the people, the scenes, and the moments certainly did, and I’ve never had a more waking urge to become generic travel blog guy #408.

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I’ve found myself planning no further than a month or 2 in advance, freelance wise, in the realization that most of my plans are naturally going to fall around the mini-trips I can budget for until my next adventure. This time around though I’ll have a better idea of all that can truly be found out there with a little searching, and a bigger audience to share stories and grow with.

While traveling requires quite a few ducats, and blatant creativity isn’t always the most lucrative, last weeks Medium announcement was a blessing in disguise. Sent to me by a friend in a Twitter chat (shoutout to my MMC family), was an article that explained that Medium’s paywall has officially been opened up for anyone to sign up for and start publishing for pay. What this means essentially is that you can sign up in about 10 minutes, give your bank info, and publish “locked” articles that basically only paying members are able to see (note: this is NOT an ad in any way, shape, or form. In fact my Medium estimates for my first month are still reading “$0.00”). Based on time spent reading, and “claps”, an estimate is given and you can get paid out simply for having people read your content. It seemed kind of too good to be true, with online reviews stating an average of ~$90 for Medium paywall writers (I’m assuming this is a skewed mean average, not median), but the fact that you could essentially re-post articles that you own the rights to meant that I could basically try it out risk free.

I started by re-posting my “How to Work For Your Favourite Rapper” article just to see if it would be able to pick up any steam without much promo at all, and how much it would make me. It’s been about 10 days and the views are still reasonably low (with $0 in estimated revenue as mentioned), but I’ve noticed that every day the stats are improving, and I’ve even managed over ten followers. For the time being I want to see how it goes, so I’ve decided to post a few more of my think-pieces on Medium, namely the content that doesn’t exactly fit here or re-posts that I want to monetize (this blog is currently 100% revenue free; I just do it because I love it in all honesty)

This week, I wrote about why the creative community has the same destructive tendency as the generic society that we tend to avoid, in terms of limiting its members to an idea of singular success (choosing one thing to be good at, and one thing only). Check out a piece of the article below, and click on excerpt below to read more! (If you sign up for a completely free account you can read 3 of these “locked” articles per month – justtt enough to read all of mine, haha)

An excerpt from Us, creative”: An Argument Against Picking Mediums

Within our own society, us, creatives claim to hate bland binaries BUT are outwardly as anti-modularity as our generic counterparts. Our equivalents of “So, what do you do?” or “What degree did you graduate with?” are “So, what do you make?” and “What’s you medium?”; As pathetic as “well,I’m a creative” sounds to the rest of the world, “well, I don’t really have a medium I just make whatever” sounds just as lame to all of us, creatives. If you create, there is some sort of expectation that at some point you’ll be notable enough in your preferred medium that you’ve effectively ‘made it’. If you shoot photos but don’t have x number of Instagram followers, you’re not a photographer, you’re a hobbyist. If you publish writing, but you don’t have x amount of notable bylines, you’re not a writer, you’re just another asshole with a free blog. If you write poetry, but don’t get at least 2 minute finger-snap ovation (I made this one up, admittedly I haven’t been to a slam poetry event yet but I imagine it’s something like this), you’re not a poet, you’re just an angsty post-teen. Sounds familiar, right? (See: “Ah, so you’ve been working at the company for 10 years, but you aren’t a manger yet? Maybe you should focus on your career a little more”). Even in popular music, not until recently did we start to see vocalists begin to hone their production and instrumental skills en masse. Besides the obvious drawbacks, what this type of destructive ideology does is effectively box many of us in. Creatives who decide to branch out across many mediums, perhaps limiting the focus of any particular area, give off the perception of less success, focus, and purpose in their respective fields.

-a how-to, by hospey.

follow my adventures on the gram @hxspey, or on twitter @hospey!

Throwaways: Endless Summer

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I really like the daytime now.

I’m not sure if it was the angst or the places I was supposed to be or because my creative time was reserved for after-dark, but for most of my adult life, I’ve always been a night person. In the last 8 or so months since graduating I’ve gained a new appreciation for the daytime. It might also have to do with the fact that I’ve been chasing an endless summer of sorts.

Australia from February to April, traveling South across the U.S.A. from April to June, a surprisingly above average Canadian summer from July to August, and finally a September road-trip to California to top it all off; It’s been great. If I could live like this forever, I think I would (the snow-bird retirees have got it all figured out).

Summer is undefeated. Warm weather, good vibes, and perhaps most importantly (in the context of this post, at least), long days. Something like 13 hours of freedom, but harder to describe; ineffable, unless I’m allowed to start using ‘summer’ as an adjective to describe itself.

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I don’t know, something about this summer was just great. I think I’ve finally found the right set of people to be around.

This photo set was shot around Victoria, BC, and Calgary, AB, and of course was all shot on a few $15-$20 dollar disposable cameras, with a few of my favourite people. I think I’m starting to get a hang of this thing.

I know I’ve been uploading slowly, but sometimes life (read as: summer) happens. There’s more soon though – you know, because winter is coming. (I don’t actually watch GoT, but just play along anyways)

-hospey

follow my adventures on the gram @hxspey, or on twitter @hospey!

How To Gain 1000 Followers In 1 Week

 Ah, the dream of striking social networking gold – isn’t this the true American dream? …Okay, probably not – but everybody likes to feel noticed every once in a while. Here is a story about the surefire way to (eventually) gain 1000 new followers in a single week. (And stay tuned for a very important lesson in math).

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Here is how to gain 1000 new followers in 1 week:

In the simplest explanation that I’ll ever give you, the easiest way to gain 1000 new followers in a week is to go viral. For those less familiar with internet terms, going viral isn’t some sort of slang for how ill you are, but rather for how ‘sickkkkk’ you are, according to the largest widespread digital audiences; In plain English, to go ‘viral’ means to have a certain piece of content circulate exponentially faster than normal across the internet, similar to a virus plaguing a culture.

But, how do you go viral? This part is a little less simple (in my experience), and a lot more time consuming that many dare to believe:

You’ll start off in high-school without much clue of what you intend to do with the rest of your life. College is coming up quick. Business school sounds good, Right?

Wrong. In less than 2 years you’ll find yourself being slowly slurped into the abysmal black hole that is conformity – your arch nemesis. With a 2.1 GPA, you will pull yourself out, terrified, and consider something “easier”.

Music, art, and culture will be your muse and will keep you hanging on mentally, while academically you’ll try your hand at a new degree – the notoriously “easy” Arts degree. You hate tests, but you won’t mind writing so Communications will be the obvious choice. What do you have to lose after all?

Eventually, school will mercifully start to get little easier and a lot more enjoyable, even if thoughts of quitting still dash across your mind occasionally. In the meantime, you and some friends will start experimenting with a new outlet – a blog, probably. It’ll be corny, and I guarantee you’ll know that it’s corny, but for some reason, you’ll enjoy it. A lot. And people will read it. A lot. About 100,000 times in your first year, to be specific. It’ll grow faster than you could ever imagine, and you’ll produce more content than you ever thought your chicken-typing fingers could output.

Two more breezy years will pass. You’ll have a few big articles – ten, maybe 20,000 hits a piece on a handful of popular posts. Oh, and you’ll have written more than 400 by this point. You’ve edited videos and snapped photos. You’ve written serious letters and some light-hearted jests. Pieces you’ve designed specifically to go viral will flop, and random, content-lacking filler pieces will gain traction. The funny thing about the internet is that it is defined as the opposite of ‘insanity’.

in·san·i·ty: noun – to do the same thing more than once and expect a different result.
in·ter·net: noun – to do the same thing more than once and expect the same result.

(editor’s note: these may or may not be the actual definitions of these words – I’ll check later)

As always though, you continue to work, head down – because you love it. Carpe Noctem is the motto by now, as it seems that every night will become later than the last, just as the ideas will become ever-more vivid. And by now you’ll be out of school, fighting the reality of inevitably having to join a droning workforce at some company that you probably despise, still just making things every day without any real wish to being noticed apart from maybe someone who will pay you for what you do.

But one day, it’ll happen. And you’ll be ready for it.

You finally become the hot topic; the timer on your 15 minutes officially starts ticking away. Hundreds of thousands see your work finally, and some even stick around. You double the following that you’ve cultivated for 5 years, in a mere few days. Many people will be proud of your amelioration, but lots more will wish to attribute this success as a mere ‘overnight’ accomplishment. I guess Sean said it best:

“And then they say it happened for me overnight, shit yeah I guess,
I guess it took ten years for me to be an overnight success”

Getting 1000 new followers might only take 7 days (sometimes), and going ‘viral’ probably will literally happen overnight. One day you might wake up to an incalculable bounty of love from the strangest corners of the world, but more times than not the lead-up, i.e. the humbling preparation was the digressive catalyst all along. It seems that as constant consumers of media, we often neglect to realize the time and effort that goes into each piece of content we gorge upon.

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So, no, going viral won’t make creation feel any more special than it already has every day for the past 5 years – when you get to wake up each morning knowing that you are about to do a little more of what you love – but it will, however, earn you 1000 new followers in one week.


This how-to was inspired by a recent reunion of mine; I got the chance to reconnect with an old friend from high school. Tony was a classmate and a teammate, but in the 5 years removed from high school we went down a couple of very different paths in very different cities, and we didn’t talk all that much.

Every time you get to see someone from your past it’s a cool feeling, and to hear that Tony was exploring his creative side as a serious possibility was great. He asked me for tips to grow his personal brand as a budding photographer, the way I had in the past 3 years as a writer. I’d be remiss to say I had much of anything to tell him.

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The other side of the lens. Tony, aka @mstrwu

When we met up again this past weekend – another month removed – I was proud to finally have some (hopefully) helpful thoughts to share. I told him 2 things.

First, I explained a theory that I am championing as “Dreamer’s Mathematics” (not to be confused with real arithmetic):

Dreamer’s mathematics is an idea that I’ve been employing every day for the last few years, that essentially says there are only 2 options for everything that you want to happen: either it will happen, or it won’t. By my math, that’s a likelihood of 1 out of 2, AKA a 50% chance that ANYTHING in your wildest dreams could happen. Not terrible odds huh? But it goes deeper than that. Take this 50% chance that you are already set out for any goal with (like working for your favourite rapper one day), and perpetually work towards placing yourself in a better position to make a certain goal or dream happen. What this means, is that every time you make a new connection or gain a new skill or share a new piece of content, you are getting closer to having the right people noticing it – eventually, 50% becomes 55%, 60%, maybe 75% – you’ll start to realize that some problems have multiple solutions; Dreamer’s math.

Not only do the laws of dreamer’s mathematics state that ANYTHING is possible, it also states that in most cases there is actually a better chance of you achieving your greatest goals than failing at them. But this also means that there is no in between – if you don’t strive to reach the entire jackpot, there is no ‘almost’ winning. But, in a risk-reward adverse world, I’d say that these odds are worth it.

Finally, I explained to him what I had learned about the importance of brand-building through my multiple (successful and failed) ventures of the past and present.

A degree in communication studies taught me that “Medium is the message“, and trial and error taught me that people actually DO care, if you can package it properly. Being able to communicate yourself and your art in a way that people can engage with, support, and feel inclined to share, is truly the key to growth in a digital age or otherwise. And once you can transform your craft into a community that people can find comfort it, it becomes a lot easier to not only be poised for growth but the continue to do what you love with longevity.

[BEWARE!!! SHAMELESS SELF-PLUG INCOMING]

This week I had the pleasure to finally launch my first real small business, Made by Hospey, where I get to help other young creatives accomplish this very same sense of relatable & marketable personal branding. I’m currently working with musicians, models, and non-profits to help boost engagement across social networks and develop strategies for growth, utilizing branding techniques (with a focus on effective communication – a departure from marketing which typically places a larger focus on metrics) to allow for better return on investments, whether that be time or money.

I’m in the business of cultivating partnerships, so if you are ever interested in learning more about things what you can do to take your creative passion to a professional level, or if you simply want to work together in the future, head over to the website for Made by Hospey, here.

To be able to become at least partly self-employed at this early stage in life has been a blessing, and I can’t wait to help more people feel this sense of fulfillment.

And, as for Tony, as you can see by some of his shots highlighted on this post and over on his Instagram, he’s on the right path. Go toss him a follow if you like his work!

-another how-to, by hospey.

follow my adventures on the gram @hxspey, or on twitter @hospey!

Interlude: 📍 elsewhere

There’s something to be achieved by leaving your comfort zone. For some people, this means departing a certain mental destination, but if you’re like me it’s often something a little more tangible that you seek.

Over the 7 or so months that have passed since graduating university I’ve had the pleasure of more than doubling the number of cities that I’ve got to explore during my entire lifespan thus far. What started as a change of scenery in the ol’ outback of Australia (read as: a big share-house 10 minutes away from Bondi Beach), seemingly seamlessly transitioned into a cross-map expedition of the United States – but now even back home in Canada, I’ve found myself making as many mini excursions as possible.

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Schedules are great and all, and finding that ideal routine is nice – but nothing quite enhances the creative experience as much a night in the back of a car in the mountains with your friends, or maybe just a solo expedition in hopes of stumbling on a place that you’ve never been before. (Sometimes I wish I was a real photographer, just for the excuse to be constantly venturing to new, cool places at all times).

Y’see, being a creative is as much about the what you produce, as it is about what you consume. A creative’s “diet” consists of everything we take in throughout the day – from the vlogger you watch in the AM, to the accounts you monitor daily on the ‘gram, and including but not limited to the events you partake in – which is why specific scenery can be so important. Not only can a little day trip act as the perfect excuse to pry your retinas off your iBlackHole for a few minutes, the sheer energy that will radiate off whatever sunset you end up watching, or lake you end up treading in will be enough to shift even the most deadset minds and spirits.


This time around, the Interlude playlist will be focused on showcasing the best upcoming talent from around the globe; some of which I had the pleasure of meeting during my travels like Jake Crocker from Seattle, WA, to some who are popping off in places I hope to venture to soon like Two Another out of London, UK, all the way to, of course, sensational artists that I found out about on the internet (like UK’s Jacob Banks who I discovered on the COLORS Berlin Facebook page singing his heart out). Oh, and you know I had to throw a Canadian in there, so Toronto’s Daniel Caeser is rightfully holding it down for those of us North of the 49th parallel.

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Check out the playlist below, and leave a comment if you know anyone from your region that I’ve gotta check out – who knows, they might even score my next Interlude.

follow my adventures on the gram @hxspey, or on twitter @hospey

How To Work For Your Favourite Rapper

Is it really possible to land your DREAM job, only a handful of months out of college? Apparently so. But I bet you’ve never had a first day like this before…

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Here is how to work for your favourite rapper:

The first day of work is never easy. You hope that your new peers will like you; you hope your new boss will be impressed. Well, today is your first day at your new job… except your job is a cross-country rap-tour, your peers are world-class musicians and your boss, who invited you on said tour, has won a triplet of Grammy awards. He’s 24, and he’s your favorite rapper.

As a 22-year-old yourself, freshly graduated, you harbor the powers of the internet and somehow secure the dream job from your thrifty confines in Sydney, Australia – a temporary shelter from the true responsibilities of the motherland – Canada. Life can happen as swiftly as a resume goes viral, and since your application happened to do so, about three weeks will pass before your first day on the job.

“Welcome to the tour! What do you do here?” You’re not really sure, yet. But you’re excited anyway. “I’m the intern!”

Fortunately, your meager sense of professionalism will protect you from coming across as too much of a fan during your first encounter with your new colleagues, and boss. A littered table, a MacBook Pro (acting as a rolling tray), and several extended hands are the first things you encounter. Don’t say much; being known as that quiet new kid is better than being known as the ‘OMG do you remember the first thing that kid said to us??!?’-guy. Your new boss and his friends will take in the Bulls game before show time, so just chill. You’ll spend most of your first day quietly strolling about, meandering as if a regular – notebook out, diligently note-taking as if this will give the impression of a sort of established journalist rather than the internet-kid-turned-shitty-blogger that you are/were/may well become.

The first few weeks will be blurry, abstract, and smoked out. Every experience eye opening; some burdening, most reddening. The hotel rooms are bigger than your future. Every time someone asks you “So… I know you’re the intern, but what do you actually do here?” you become less sure of yourself. What nobody will warn you about touring with 90 others is the loneliness. Individual loneliness, but collectively as well – impersonal, half-day rendezvous the crew will make at each venue or hotel will leave much to be desired. As a family though, the growth is rich. Around those deeply eased by each other’s presence, quickly, you will find comfort as well. You’re thankful for this family, even if you are never truly able to externalize these feelings besides rolling out of your bus-bunk each day and greeting everyone with whatever designated handshake you’ve become privy to.

As your tenure continues, the daily happenings (consisting of: movie-club, games 21, chain-smoking Backwoods, and digesting barely-palatable catering) feel like second nature. As routine as the schedule may feel, the lifestyle will be anything but. Unforeseen circumstances constantly arrive and must be dutifully accounted for. Appointments will have to be re-arranged to accommodate story time with Dave Chappelle. You will have to fit in dinner time drinks with Fonzworth Bentley. Physical activity is a must – try hoops with the Migos ft. Myles Turner, or perhaps a private volleyball game at Bonnaroo. Downtime will consist of a quiet New York eve; a casual 5-star meal, family style, followed by GQ’s NBA Playoff viewing party should suffice.

Of these experiences, you’ll want to tell your friends everything, yet you physically won’t be able to tell them about the moments of which words won’t muster meaning, nor the aspects that encapsulated the experience because you still can’t describe them. It’ll take a while.

By the last few weeks, you will be exhausted. You will be fucking exhausted. You will be energized by the amazing creatives and beautiful people in your constant presence. Like Tyler, you will be a walking paradox. While watching your boss –your boss– take the stage in his ‘worlds best dad’ tee, tweaking each sound-check to perfection, the concept of a ‘finish line’ will disappear from mind. Watching the gang roll five, ten, sometimes fifteen deep on whatever miniature motorized vehicle they can get their hands on, like a biker gang beckoning the kingdom, you will understand the importance of your closest circles. Reminders of displacement and trajectory are constant; Skype calls to friends and family remind you exactly how far away from home you are, yet how far you still have to go.

After adjustments, by tours end, you will come to a realization: there’s no right way to work for your favorite rapper. In fact, there may not even be a way to work for your favorite rapper. Compensation won’t come to mind, nor per diems – you would’ve done it for free. After all, a story’s worth a thousand resumes.

Prior to your journey, you will have been bred with cautionary reminders to be wary of your wishes. Post, your outlook will relax. There’s less to worry about than you think. Seamlessly, 32 shows will pass and your admiration will never waver. Hell, you might just come out of the other end with 1 or 2 timeless stories and a new group of people to call ‘family’.


My time as intern for Chance the Rapper is something that could never be justifiably summed up in words (trust me: I wrote thousands of words on tour, scrapped multiple ideas post-tour, and over a month later I’ve finally come up with something I can be proud of). It was a time of transition in my life that marked a shift from slightly hesitant sometimes-blogger putting off getting a real job, into a confident multi-faceted creative with a taste of how great it all could be – and the newfound realization of the person that I’m meant to be.

chanceandhosp

In the past I’ve noted my feelings of sorrow for those in life who never truly realize what they are meant to be, but until the Be Encouraged Tour I never truly had an opportunity to interact with so many people who had seemingly reached the level of content in their contributions to the culture that I too hope to reach one day (and yes, I hate the phrase “the culture” just as much as you do). There were many times that I questioned myself and wondered why exactly I was where I was, but I really do feel that I was graced with this opportunity for a reason.

I can talk all I want about my run-ins with various celebrities including the ones I lived with for 2 months, or how a taste of the VIP lifestyle changed me, but the first moment that really left shivers down my spine was a slightly more natural one:

Night 2 at the Red Rocks Amphitheater in Denver, CO.

 The band intros happen nearly halfway thru the show, and after the ovation for ‘Mr. Nico Segal’, ”Sunday Candy” begins. Suddenly, it was if the heavens literally opened up for a second; right as the vocalists harmonized the lines “Come on in this house, cause it’s gonna rain, Rain down Zion, it’s gonna rain”, the most peaceful light mist fell from the sky until the end of the song and as suddenly as they started, ceased. Something about that moment made me realize that I, or rather we, were doing something right, enough so to please our God & Mother Nature & the sky themselves.

(Corny right? Oh well.)

Chance is exactly like the man you’d picture him to be, as a family man, business man, and friend, so instead of another biography, the last thing I’ll note is possibly my favourite quote from my entire trip with him. He once forgot to put on his signature ‘3’ cap before a show in the second half of tour, and as his assistant Colleen reminded him of it he turned and said with an insightful smirk, “you know what’s funny? If I didn’t put this hat on tonight, there would’ve been a Complex article by tomorrow rationalizing exactly why I didn’t wear this hat”.

What more can I say? What makes him such a great person is his understanding that while many of us care to sensationalize the few shreds that we get may get from him, he can better use his influence to spread the type of community-boosting positivity & joy that he is now so well known for.

All that is really left to say, once more, is thank you, Chance.

-A how-to, by hospey.

follow my adventures on the gram @hxspey, or on twitter @hospey