How to Watch The Sunset

There are few natural feats in life that deliver as much sheer beauty as a sunset.

You might have or favourite spot, or maybe you’re a chaser wherever you are. Maybe you like to go by yourself, or maybe you have a special sunset buddy. Regardless, there is something special about that transition from golden hour to moonlit dusk.

But what is the best way to perfectly indulge in the sunset? Just follow these pointers.

hospeyhowtoWATERMARK

Here is How To Watch The Sunset:

“Bondi Sunset” – “5:38”, google replies. 5:14, you take flight off the main doorstep.

I don’t know why, but you’ll ALWAYS be late, so plan ahead. Try to time it so that you arrive at your spot at least 15-20 minutes before the sun is scheduled to start setting. And remember, even if you’re early, you’re still late. So don’t worry too much.

Tucked in the hills of North, Bondi in Sydney, Australia, a magical spot presides. It’s not the most secluded, or the least known, but it’s perfect. It’s a mere meetup for the non-existent sun-setters club, and you’ve just gained membership. You have only a handful of minutes until it’s time, and the bus is pulling up as close as it’ll go, each stop beforehand playing Jenga with your angst. At this point, with your nose pressed against the window, the billowy clouds over the bay will start to seem closer than science should allow. You’ll hop off the bus as cumulus destiny seems to summon you. You’ll want to stop and set up camp right then and there, but you haven’t quite made it to your spot yet – snap out of it. You will start the playlist.

 – – – – –

“Clouds Never Get Old”; Bas harkens the sky with a bouncy ode as you stroll to your spot, gazing up at the sky as if it was your first time seeing it. “Palm Trees” will play as you settle in. Relaxed and taking in the beauty, you’ll seek out the perfect vantage point. A few minutes will pass, and as the sun struggles to peek out over the skyline the cotton candy clouds will 2-step as Frank Ocean’s intro begins. “Pink+White” takes over your soul – green, your body.  Hearing Frank naturally makes you want to hear more Frank.

The beginning of the 2nd half of “Nights” marks the end of another day to most, or the beginning of another for a creative, as you peer out and finally seem to understand the color navy. (Not an ocean blue, but it’s not quite purple either. It’s underneath the clouds, yet never eclipses the horizon. As sure as you’ve ever been of anything).

Sampha’s hymns a background for your truest admirations. You’ll embrace the beauty of the sky, the day, maybe the person you are with (I’m not too sure), and finally exactly where you are at this very moment in life, and realize that even if you never think of this moment ever again, you’ll never forget it. “4422”. The actualizations set in and the energy of your surroundings and everything in reach resurface as the harsh vibrations of “Foreign Fields”. Maybe it’s the lack of sun, but you have chills.

Quiñ’s voice haunts you, and you free-fall back to earth with cinder blocks of emotion bound to your ankles. Gerald gives you something(/someone) relatable(/regrettable) to think about, and you feel it. (I’m not sure what that something is, it’s ineffable, but you’ll know it when you feel it). The quintessential nighttime song, nothing else man-made has ever made you feel that way.

 – – – – –

The sunset is now over and so is the playlist, and you’ve already started trying to re-materialize the fading ink. One by one the stars start to appear, and you start to attempt to rationalize the last 28 minutes.

You can’t because there isn’t anything to rationalize. It was just another perfect sunset.


FullSizeRender (21)

This was the sunset tonight. I really wasn’t lying. It’s really hard to write about, or even remember these type of evenings after the fact.

I wrote this piece by hand during an early April sunset in Bondi, my first after another bout with a creative block. All together I spent about a month piecing together the ideas for this, starting with venturing to a bunch of ideal spots, experimenting with the right songs for the playlist, and finally getting out and testing it out for myself. The block coming via an abundance of overwhelming news, I think this is exactly the piece I was hoping for, and needed.

Again, the listenable playlist is here, in case you missed it (I would’ve embedded it, but 8tracks’ WordPress add-on looks horrendous, and Frank isn’t on Soundcloud). Try it out at your next sunset, and let me know if it works for you too.

sunsetlist

Lord knows I haven’t seen the sunrise is almost 3 years, but I don’t think there is anything I love more than a good sunset. Maybe that is just the night-person in me.

a how-to,

by hospey.

follow my adventures on the gram @hxspey, or on twitter @hospey

Throwaways: Brisbane

17202993_10156003195584552_3971289997789952006_n

17264760_10156003296589552_9141183030319196990_n

17201321_10156003185149552_5467759229897315181_n

17156229_10156003167084552_7510627005882058140_n

Throwaways is something that I have been conceptualizing for a very long time. The premise is quite simple: go to a cool place. take photos in said place with a disposable camera. post the photos, here – untouched& unaltered (untitled & unmastered as well, word to Kendrick Lamar). Something about a disposable film picture just has that perfectly timeless appeal to it.

Basically, I saw my good friend (and AMAZING photographer) Thomas Kempster do something similar with his website a few years ago in Hong Kong, and as someone with very minimal photography experience, I figured this watered down version of the project would be ideal for my travels. Besides the fact that I don’t know the first thing about a camera, and that I am more than broke, the real reason for this series was that I thought ‘throwaways’ was such an amazing pun for photos taken on a ‘disposable’ that I had to do it.


Brisbane was quite an experience to say the least. It was our first Australian city, but we were blessed with not only having Madi as a recognizable face & tour-guide right off of the plane, but we also stayed in an amazing (/air conditioned… basically the only criteria for ‘amazing’) hostel, made our first few friends and acquaintances in fellow travelers, and had our first few good times.

Beers, friends, and dance battles quickly became the theme of the tour. I wouldn’t change a second of it. (Oh, and I even got my the 2nd sunburn of my entire life! Wouldn’t change that, either.)

-Hospey.

follow my adventures on the gram @hxspey, or on twitter @hospey

How To Live Comfortably While Travelling:

Perhaps the scariest thing about backpacking, or even moving to a new country is wondering how you will be able to maintain your regular, everyday lifestyle. To avoid shock in a new country, just follow these tips.

hospeyhowtoWATERMARK

Here is How To Live Comfortably While Travelling:

As with everything in life, preparation is key. Do some research, give yourself a head start. No matter what you read, you probably know best so you’ll ignore all hints and bring the necessities of home. For me, this meant clothing. Lots of clothing. Oh, and shoes. (“So, I’m heading to Australia in the middle of summertime? Yea, better bring 5 different jackets. And 5 pairs of Vans. Just in case they don’t sell these super necessary things down there”).

Packing is key. No one wants to be under-packed, so over-pack instead. People can live off 60L bags for months? Nah, you’re no peasant. Bring 2 suitcases worth of stuff, after-all you’re no back-packer­, you’re a ‘traveler’.

It’ll be alright for the first few weeks, a little bit of discomfort is expected… right? Ubering everywhere (like my name was Madeintyo) because the amount of luggage you will have is more than a little difficult to get from hostel to hostel with. Whatever, finding a house is the next step anyways; THEN you will be glad I have all of this stuff.

Turns out, it’s not that easy to find a place in a market that you have no idea about. It’ll take a few attempts. You’ll buzz an older couple on the 7th floor for a showing. They’re nice. Weird, but nice(ish). The gentleman would offer you a beer if he wasn’t on his last one already. The compromise seems strained, but in the end it doesn’t work out anyways.

Back to the hostel.

The rooms are crammed, the bathroom is dirty, and for some reason the simple task of making friends is more and more difficult with each move. It’s kind of like that one time your family moved cross country and you had to make all new friends in the 5th grade… except you’re 20-something and you’re just moving down the street or to a new room, but there’s no playground this time – only booze.

You’ll finally luck out on a house – It’s a little out of your price range, you’ll be sharing with 10 other people that you haven’t met yet, and you pray that your roommate isn’t too strange; he’s cool and everyone is nice, but for some reason you feel like it’s taking some time to fit in. You’re alone most of the day, and you’re fine with that because….


You know what? Fuck this article. This is NOT why I started doing this.

I started writing this piece last week while I was feeling down on my luck. I’d been in the county for exactly 1 month, with what seemed like very little to show for it. I was sleeping on a bed without sheets, without a job nor enough money to pay for the 2nd week in my new house, all in a city where I knew virtually no one. The honeymooner-vacation phase was over and real life was crashing down on me. Hard.

To be honest, I can’t recall how upset I actually was or if I just felt like some sob-story views would make me feel better. But what I can say with certainty is that I made this website to share my stories and experiences, and always keep it 100% real. I did that, and at the time, I couldn’t even finish this post. That was my reality – and most likely will be the reality for every traveler at some point. Travelling isn’t always what Instagram makes it to be; There isn’t always cold drinks and beautiful people at hand, and the sun definitely isn’t always shining. You’re in a new place for a reason: TO LEARN. Though learning often means absorbing something from every great encounter that you have, sometimes it also means understanding what can be taught from the hardest times in your life as well.

Today, my reality is nothing like it was at this very same time last week, so in an effort to keep these stories of my adventures 100% real (okay, I might have to embellish sometimes… but what kind of storyteller would I be if I didn’t?) I cannot finish that post the way it was going. What I can do is tell you about some of my more recent experiences, and finish explaining ‘how to be comfortable while travelling’ – it all comes back to the same point I was trying to make, anyways.

I may get into more details a little later (most likely later this week on my other website, RLGTcanada.com), but so far this week I have: Got a well-paying job, had some amazing conversations with my roommates from around the world, caught up with some old friends & made 1 or 2 new ones, went to my first concert in Australia, got to meet an artist I’ve been listening too since I was 19, redesigned this website, and done the most writing that I’ve done in months. I’m not sure if it was the natural energy of being back in a music environment, or the paycheck (it really is amazing how $400 dollars can make you feel like a king) – but whatever it is, my creative side hasn’t been this invigorated since I started RLGT 2 years ago.

I feel full of energy, confident, and interested – but not comfortable.

But maybe that’s the beauty of this whole thing. Going back to the Bas article that I published a few days ago, this lifestyle will always be one big lesson in culture. It’s not about being comfortable or feeling like I’m at home. It’s about being attentive & adaptive to the world around you… and possibly seeing some cool shit every now and again. Travelling is fun, but it’s not easy. And part of me thinks that is the way is supposed to me.

-A how-to, by Hospey.

follow my adventures on the gram @hxspey, or on twitter @hospey