How to Get Paid To Write Online

Every creative has a dream of one day being paid simply to keep making what they love. For some, this may mean in a workplace setting, for some this means freelancing, and for those chosen few that are deemed important enough, their audiences alone can provide enough funding to survive happily. Learn about a new way for writers to make money online WHILE building up their followings.

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Here is how to get paid to write and publish online:

When I started this blog almost 10 months ago, it was basically an “anti-travel-blog” travel blog. I hated the ideas pressed by travel blogs, and I hated the idea that somehow flying 14 hours away from home for a few months would change me.

10 months later this still isn’t a traditional travel blog in any sense, and flying to Australia didn’t change me. With that said, this isn’t a travel blog because it’s less about the travel itself, as it is about the stories. Being physically located in every place I’ve gotten the chance to see over these 10 months (a list way bigger than I ever anticipated) didn’t change me, but the people, the scenes, and the moments certainly did, and I’ve never had a more waking urge to become generic travel blog guy #408.

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I’ve found myself planning no further than a month or 2 in advance, freelance wise, in the realization that most of my plans are naturally going to fall around the mini-trips I can budget for until my next adventure. This time around though I’ll have a better idea of all that can truly be found out there with a little searching, and a bigger audience to share stories and grow with.

While traveling requires quite a few ducats, and blatant creativity isn’t always the most lucrative, last weeks Medium announcement was a blessing in disguise. Sent to me by a friend in a Twitter chat (shoutout to my MMC family), was an article that explained that Medium’s paywall has officially been opened up for anyone to sign up for and start publishing for pay. What this means essentially is that you can sign up in about 10 minutes, give your bank info, and publish “locked” articles that basically only paying members are able to see (note: this is NOT an ad in any way, shape, or form. In fact my Medium estimates for my first month are still reading “$0.00”). Based on time spent reading, and “claps”, an estimate is given and you can get paid out simply for having people read your content. It seemed kind of too good to be true, with online reviews stating an average of ~$90 for Medium paywall writers (I’m assuming this is a skewed mean average, not median), but the fact that you could essentially re-post articles that you own the rights to meant that I could basically try it out risk free.

I started by re-posting my “How to Work For Your Favourite Rapper” article just to see if it would be able to pick up any steam without much promo at all, and how much it would make me. It’s been about 10 days and the views are still reasonably low (with $0 in estimated revenue as mentioned), but I’ve noticed that every day the stats are improving, and I’ve even managed over ten followers. For the time being I want to see how it goes, so I’ve decided to post a few more of my think-pieces on Medium, namely the content that doesn’t exactly fit here or re-posts that I want to monetize (this blog is currently 100% revenue free; I just do it because I love it in all honesty)

This week, I wrote about why the creative community has the same destructive tendency as the generic society that we tend to avoid, in terms of limiting its members to an idea of singular success (choosing one thing to be good at, and one thing only). Check out a piece of the article below, and click on excerpt below to read more! (If you sign up for a completely free account you can read 3 of these “locked” articles per month – justtt enough to read all of mine, haha)

An excerpt from Us, creative”: An Argument Against Picking Mediums

Within our own society, us, creatives claim to hate bland binaries BUT are outwardly as anti-modularity as our generic counterparts. Our equivalents of “So, what do you do?” or “What degree did you graduate with?” are “So, what do you make?” and “What’s you medium?”; As pathetic as “well,I’m a creative” sounds to the rest of the world, “well, I don’t really have a medium I just make whatever” sounds just as lame to all of us, creatives. If you create, there is some sort of expectation that at some point you’ll be notable enough in your preferred medium that you’ve effectively ‘made it’. If you shoot photos but don’t have x number of Instagram followers, you’re not a photographer, you’re a hobbyist. If you publish writing, but you don’t have x amount of notable bylines, you’re not a writer, you’re just another asshole with a free blog. If you write poetry, but don’t get at least 2 minute finger-snap ovation (I made this one up, admittedly I haven’t been to a slam poetry event yet but I imagine it’s something like this), you’re not a poet, you’re just an angsty post-teen. Sounds familiar, right? (See: “Ah, so you’ve been working at the company for 10 years, but you aren’t a manger yet? Maybe you should focus on your career a little more”). Even in popular music, not until recently did we start to see vocalists begin to hone their production and instrumental skills en masse. Besides the obvious drawbacks, what this type of destructive ideology does is effectively box many of us in. Creatives who decide to branch out across many mediums, perhaps limiting the focus of any particular area, give off the perception of less success, focus, and purpose in their respective fields.

-a how-to, by hospey.

follow my adventures on the gram @hxspey, or on twitter @hospey!

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